Coiltek Coil
Last Post 09 Jun 2014 05:03 PM by FRANK NOVAK. 14 Replies.
Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
Kent CreamerUser is Offline
Greenhorn
Greenhorn
Posts:23



--
30 May 2014 06:26 AM

    I have a Xterra 705 and I am looking a purchasing a Coiltek 15" coil for it.  Is it worth the money?  Which would be better, the 6 inch or the 15"?

    TIM LEIBELUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:588



    --
    30 May 2014 07:26 AM
    Kent , I am by no means an expert. But I have been learning a lot and watching the training videos that came with my new Garrett AT and the bigger coil as I understand it will cover more ground but not go as deep. The smaller coil helps pinpoint smaller objects at deeper depths if I understood Garrett's pitch for their 4 inch coil. Hope this helps.
    Kent CreamerUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:23



    --
    30 May 2014 07:29 AM

    I have an AT Pro as well and was thinking about getting the smaller coil for it.

    PAUL SANNESUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:7



    --
    03 Jun 2014 08:42 PM
    I have a AT Gold and use a 4.5" Sniper Coil. I rarely use the 5x8 coil that came with the machine. It has paid me with allot of nuggets & flakes.
    TIM LEIBELUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:588



    --
    04 Jun 2014 06:18 AM
    My understanding is the smaller the coil the more focused the search. Like Paul said above the 4.5 inch coil for the AT Pro makes it a nugget hunting monster. The company says it looks deeper but in a smaller area at a time.
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    05 Jun 2014 02:22 PM
    I have been detecting since the '70s and I always use the coil that came with the detector. I have several detectors and have found just about everything you can find with a detector. I prospect, but I also cache hunt so I just about cover the field of detecting. By the way, what's wrong with the original coil? Frank...-













    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:406



    --
    07 Jun 2014 09:05 PM
    From my 30 plus years as an avionics technician, I do understand waveform propagation and detection. When it comes to metal detectors, I think a good way to understand the importance of coil size is all related first to the power output of the machine first, and then 2nd of all it would be the frequency of the signal being transmitted. Imagine the shape of an Ice cream cone and that would be the signal being transmitted into the ground. Higher frequencies would  be able to detect smaller objects because of the shorter wave lengths of the signal. But with more power the signal can go deeper. However, with a longer wavelength,(lower frequency) the signal can go deeper but not be as sensitive to smaller targets but highly effective with a larger target. This is mainly with VLF machines. Now with Pulse Induction different story....I equate that more with similarity to a radar transmitter. But a smaller coil size translates to "concentration" of the transmitted power which increases sensitivity to smaller targets but covers less area. A larger coil with the same rated power would cover more area with less depth.
    Leo
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    08 Jun 2014 07:51 AM

    Hay Leo, I worked 0ver 30 years in electronics so we both look deeper into the detector functions than most.  You nailed the functions fairly well. I did some work in sat receivers, but most of my work was in control circuits. I think you were dead on in the frequency comment. The Navy is the only one I know that is using 2 Hz for communications with subs and the new sats have gone beyond anything I worked on.   In my comments, what I was trying to get across is that I go for the 'average best size' coil and never change it. I have found everything from pickers to boat anchors with the 9.5" stock coils on my Whites detectors.  Cache hunting is a different story. I have found caches at 6' with my old Hays 2 Box. The 90 degree phase offset and the large spacing between coils gives it the depth.  Here's a crazy thing about the Hays. The metal trim on the cases are actually the coils!

    Hay, maybe I am just lazy and just use the stock coils so I don't have to change them. lol , But I think they have found just about every type of object that be found. Happy hunting,  Frank...-

     

    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:406



    --
    08 Jun 2014 01:35 PM

    Thanks Frank. See that is my confusion as well when it comes to coils. I see quite a bit written about them and see many questions being asked. And if someone's electronic knowledge goes no further than replacing batteries in the detector, it could be worse for them trying to comprehend it all. Late 2013 I bought a Whites TLD pro and it has 2 stock coils. Right away I started thinking if I should replace them or not for something that will give me better performance. But...I only used it twice, so I am going to forget that idea. Why don't someone make "high" powered detector's to really punch through the ground. Well I know PI machines do that but how about VLF's. Maybe there are limitations by the FCC as to how much power one can put out before it is classified as a "broadcasting station" or require a permit to operate! I am hoping to get out to Nevada this month and learn more of it.

     

    Leo
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    08 Jun 2014 06:23 PM
    Leo, There is a limit set by the FCC for permit free broadcastion. The RF circuit on everything below that limit is usually fixed.  Another big problem is you would probably waste that extra power when you ground balenced or suffer heavy background noise. Hay be prepared,  Nevada this time of the year is usually triple digits. Guess what, Nevada is the largest gold producer in the US.   Have a good time,   Frank...-
    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    08 Jun 2014 06:26 PM
    Leo, There is a limit set by the FCC for permit free broadcasting. The RF circuit on everything below that limit is usually fixed.  Another big problem is you would probably waste that extra power when you ground balanced or suffer heavy background noise. Hay be prepared,  Nevada this time of the year is usually triple digits. Guess what, Nevada is the largest gold producer in the US.   Have a good time,   Frank...-
    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:406



    --
    08 Jun 2014 08:42 PM

    Well I usually hangout in Reno and Lovelock area and I don't notice the heat that much. I actually like it.  I think its much more tolerable than what we have in Miami with humidity.

    I wouldnt want to be in Arizona though in summer, that is extreme!

    Leo
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    09 Jun 2014 09:46 AM

    Leo, you sound like one of the snowbirds. I stopped by Stanton a few years back and talked with some of the LDMA  members. They said they were heading north before summer hit there.  I am in Good Sam and LOW and travel in a small MH. I use for a base camp when I prospect or cache hunt. This was taken near Stanton.  Frank...-

     

     

     

     Hay, 4 wheel drive and 305 Diesel ponies. I went down some of the jeep trails.

    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:406



    --
    09 Jun 2014 03:20 PM
    Do you drag an ATV with you too? I am in the process of getting my spare truck ready to take out to Reno and leave it there for my trips. I am going to make it my main agenda to hit the deserts in Mojave and Arizona this coming winter as much as I can. I am tired of researching and studying. Its time for me to get serious and hit the good ground. That picture of yours looks so much like the ground they have out in Australia, dark red and hard, and full of gold.
    Leo
    FRANK NOVAKUser is Offline
    Sluicer
    Sluicer
    Posts:69



    --
    09 Jun 2014 05:03 PM

    I  Leo, I use to tow a dune buggy, 64VW chassis and &74 Engine, but it needs some repairs so it is sitting in my yard. I found I really didn't need it most of the time since I could get in the center of most claims with the MH. It is only 21' long and is essentially a Ram HD truck beefed up to 12K # capacity. it is an ideal base camp. All the comforts of home in the boonies. Queen size bed for the old back and fresh coffee to wake me in the morning.  It's an '05 MH but it is built to last. Aluminum floor and welded frame with a one peace fiberglass shell. Air bags in the rear and 4 wheel drive.  It will probably outlast me. lol  It has been Maryland to West coast several times.  I am mostly a cache hunter, but I fill in with prospecting on trips looking for caches.  I just spent a year researching one and trying to get permission to search the site, Finally got permission to hunt for the $50,000 in gold $20 coins. Spent 2 weeks searching with my Hayes 2 Box only to find two big holes under a big bolder on a hill side.   Well that makes my find ratio about 1 in 10. 

     

    Good luck up in Nevada.   Frank...-

                                                                   This was taken in Quartzite several years back. 

     

     

     

    I deal in reality and call them as I see them. Frank
    You are not authorized to post a reply.