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Last Post 05 Jan 2022 08:30 PM by  Wayne Crowder
Program for finding coordinates on a map?
 10 Replies
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Steve Tuey
Greenhorn
Greenhorn
Posts:11



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20 Dec 2021 11:09 PM
    I need advice please. I’m new to the GPS coordinates thing and need to know what program you all use to locate claim boundaries? I can find the egress point and center point by clicking on those figures here on this site but the rest is confusing to me. Thanks a lot.
    Lincoln Ritterhouse
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:10



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    22 Dec 2021 05:01 AM
    I need to learn this as well.
    Don Davison
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:2



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    27 Dec 2021 10:50 AM
    Land Matters has a web site you need to learn. On the side bar you click on the x y icon and then place your cursor on the place you want then click to get the coordinates.
    Wayne Crowder
    Highbanker
    Highbanker
    Posts:104



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    27 Dec 2021 03:27 PM
    You can use Google Earth to find coordinates and set the specific format the coordinates appear. It's also useful for drawing boundaries, putting in points of interest, measuring distance and more.

    It's a bit of a challenge to learn, but very useful in drawing boundaries, such as claims then saving them in your list.

    You can also use it to got to a set of coordinates you input. Sometimes it works better to look at the coordinates from your cursor then use that format to input your "go to" numbers.

    Wayne
    Lincoln Ritterhouse
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:10



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    30 Dec 2021 04:48 AM
    Thank you, guys. My G Earth was already set to correct format in the lower right corner. So I would copy and paste the just move the mouse until I had the correct co-ordinates. Zoom until I was as close as I can get. Not as quick and easy as copy, paste and search but it works for me. I learned to use the feature that allows me to draw outside of claim from a GPAA video.
    Steve Tuey
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:11



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    05 Jan 2022 12:22 AM
    Hi Wayne and thank you for the reply! So are you saying to skip google maps and use Google Earth instead? That is what I am getting from your answer. Can you draw the boundaries out using the coordinates listed on the guide and then save that in the cloud or download? Can you then look at your present location and see where you are on the claim? Sounds like a good system!
    Steve Tuey
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:11



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    05 Jan 2022 12:25 AM
    Thank you for your reply Don! I will check it out. What do you do if you don't have a cell signal?
    Steve Tuey
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:11



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    05 Jan 2022 12:27 AM
    Hey Lincoln, thanks for the info. Is that video still available and is it on this website?
    Lincoln Ritterhouse
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:10



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    05 Jan 2022 05:51 AM
    Yes, The GPAA has videos on the website but I searched YouTube.
    Don Davison
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:2



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    05 Jan 2022 10:08 AM
    If no cell service, you can download the map before or (shift, windows icon, letter s) copy and paste the area to Word and print out before leaving home.
    I take the coordinates with me and put in a handheld GPS that doesn't need cell service to operate.
    Wayne Crowder
    Highbanker
    Highbanker
    Posts:104



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    05 Jan 2022 08:30 PM
    Steve,
    1. Sometimes I use Google Earth and Google Maps, but usually am using Google Earth then it has a button to toggle to Google Maps. I have trouble seeing stream names and road names sometimes in Google Earth. Its pretty easy to switch back and forth.

    2.Yes, you can set the corners of the claim using the map "pin". Then draw the boundary between pins. Save the claim boundaries right on your Google Earth in the left hand side. You can even print out the map. I usually cut and paste it into my MS Word then print. Maybe there is a better way, I just use what I know.

    3. Not sure about your last question? You can see where your cursor is on the map, relative to the claim. Your location on the ground when you're out in the boonies can be found by using a GPS app on your phone or by using a hand held GPS.

    Good luck! Winter is the best time for me to get things lined out for the coming season. Right now we have over a foot of snow on the ground, so prospecting is out for now.

    Wayne


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