Rattlesnakes
Last Post 07 Jun 2015 11:01 PM by Benjamin Crain. 44 Replies.
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JAMES SLAYUser is Offline
Greenhorn
Greenhorn
Posts:7



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16 Apr 2015 05:52 AM
    We encountered a Black Southern Pacific Rattlesnake on the trail at Bautista Placer, as we headed back to our vehicle yesterday 4-15, we weren't wearing snake chaps but will be wearing them next time. Walk with caution and wear your chaps!
    ARTHUR WAUGHUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
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    16 Apr 2015 07:08 AM

    That time of year again, coming out of the dens.

     

    Look close before you reach or step, will save you some grief.

    OHV/Recreation Representative, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council, BLM--- President, Wolfpack 4x4's, Region 5, Pacific Northwest 4 Wheel Drive Association--- Member- Mid Valley Prospectors, Brownsville, OR chapter GPAA, Willamette Valley Miners, Bohemia Mine Owners Association
    Benjamin CrainUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
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    16 Apr 2015 07:20 AM

    This time of year it's the babies you really have to look out for, they cant rattle and they stay near trails hunting mice. I have lucked out by wearing high boots when I was just standing there and felt something tapping my ankle. I looked down and realized I was standing on it about mid way and it was doing it's best to bite through my leather.

     

    BTW, they make some Snake Bite Gaiters that will cover you up to your knee and they are light weight and easy to put on. In the old days we had to wear those hard plastic things that just plain sucked. Now these new light ones not only protect against snake bite but also help will keep away the cacti thorns. Just look them up online, there are many brands to choose from.

    JAMES SLAYUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
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    16 Apr 2015 08:21 AM

    If anyone knows of an anti-venom rattlesnake bite kit that they would recommend, I would appreciate any info and/or links to where snakebite kit could be purchased. After a close call yesterday, I'd like to make sure and have one in my pack next time, if there is a lifesaving product out there.

    Thank you very much for any and all responses, comments and info on the subject of rattlesnakes,  

    James "Dudley" Slay

    Benjamin CrainUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:326



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    16 Apr 2015 08:54 AM
    My Ex-wife whom was an Emergency Room Nurse Practitioner told me a few year back that they quit making the anti-venom and instead just treat the patient. I don't know if she was correct but I haven't seen anti-venom used in years but instead they open the limb to allow swelling and put the patient on dialysis to assist the kidneys in removing the damaged red blood cells and preventing them from shutting down.
    PAUL STRAUBUser is Offline
    Nugget Shooter
    Nugget Shooter
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    16 Apr 2015 10:35 AM
    Check on e-bay they have about 150 snake bite kits listed. also check with places like Bass Outdoors or Cabelas, just about any outdoor or hiking supply store should have them.
    AKA: Nodnor the Wise -- LDMA/GPAA Lifetime -- Member--Northwest GA Chapter GPAA -- SGMA -- Live long and prospect! -- Remember: Without tools, we're just animals in pants!!
    Benjamin CrainUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
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    16 Apr 2015 11:13 AM
    You actually brought up a very good question. I am from Texas and out in the West we have more Rattlers than any other snake, though Copperheads were around a bit too. Where we used to hunt at was 45 min away from the nearest hospital but only 25 minutes away from the nearest town. We used to say if you get bit don't even bother driving to the nearest hospital, take the time to drive the extra 45 minutes to Abilene Texas if you wish to survive. But with Life Flight much of that has changed and each of us should either put there number in our cell phone or Emergency Frequency in our Ham Radios if out of cell range.

    As an old Army Medic I will tell you that each bite is different and some are harmless, but you never know until you get bit. There is a guy that runs a shop Called "Rattlesnake Ranch" and sells live rattlers by the pound, he has been bit more times than he can count and he will tell you that each time you get bit your body reacts worse, you don't become more immune. When I am standing next to him and thousands of rattlers I tend to take his advice.

    I have bought "Snake bite kits" since I was a child and I don't know if they work or don't. When you get bit if the venom only gets into the shallow lymph system some of the suction devices might work, the lymph node tourniquet seems to be the best way to slow the venom moving upstream, but you are not going to do anything to stop a deep bite, get to the hospital ASAP if bit.
    JAMES SLAYUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
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    16 Apr 2015 01:44 PM
    Thank you very much to, Arthur, Benjamin and Paul for all of your valuable comments, info and ideas on rattlesnakes and protection from them !
    I really appreciate it !!
    James "Dudley" Slay
    ADAM ANDREWSUser is Offline
    Treasure Hunter
    Treasure Hunter
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    20 Apr 2015 12:33 PM
    Here's the thing to watch for...Since the Rattlesnakes in the California Mountains & Deserts can be the color of the gravel itself...Watch out for a curled up Cinnamon bun shape in the gravel. That's the ONLY way to notice them, I thought it was a curled up Cow poo at first. It's creepy how the Rattlesnakes blend in with the color of the terrain.
    SONIA CHAMBERLAINUser is Offline
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    21 Apr 2015 02:33 PM

    Make some noise also.  A startled snake will strike because it feels an imminent threat.  If  a snake hears you coming, it will often will go the other way, but not always.  I have had sidewinders chase me.  Cabala's sells good snake chaps and gaiters, but you can usually find them cheaper on ebay.  I wouldn't go in the desert without my gaiters, especially when detecting because my headset can muffle a rattle or hiss.

    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
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    21 Apr 2015 05:07 PM
    How often do you actually see them around? I am wondering if at night time when we are camping, will they come around the tents or if its ok to where sandals or flip flops around the tents at night? Is there a certain temperature where its most likely they will not be out in the evening ?
    Leo
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
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    21 Apr 2015 05:07 PM
    How often do you actually see them around? I am wondering if at night time when we are camping, will they come around the tents or if its ok to where sandals or flip flops around the tents at night? Is there a certain temperature where its most likely they will not be out in the evening ?
    Leo
    Benjamin CrainUser is Offline
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    22 Apr 2015 11:15 AM
    You are more likely to come across them when detecting because you are covering more ground and running your detector in nooks and crannies they like to sit in during the day to hunt mice. At night I personally have had a larger problem with Copperheads coming out to feed. But rattlers are like gold, they are where they are. If you know where a Den is stay away from the area unless you have chaps, there can literally be thousands of them near a Den area right as the weather is beginning to warm up.

    A friend of mine who works oil pipelines told me recently that the Rattlers in Texas have pretty much stopped rattling or even moving when you get close because the wild hogs love to eat them so they stay silent not to alert a hog it's location.

    But this time of year it's the babies that scare me, they can't rattle and you just can't see them. Oh, and dusk is the worst time of day to be walking around, it's mainly when they come out to hunt.
    ARTHUR WAUGHUser is Offline
    Buzzard
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    22 Apr 2015 12:18 PM

    As far as in camp, yep, come across a couple.  Generally the activity around camp will make them move off, but not a golden rule.  As for temps, if it is warm enough for flip-flops, it is warm enough for them to be out and about.  When it get hot, they will seek out some shade.  They will be out at night, as most of their prey are nocturnal.

     

    If you are in known snake country and wearing flip-flops, IMO, you are testing the odds.  May get away with it for a long time, but eventually..........

    OHV/Recreation Representative, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council, BLM--- President, Wolfpack 4x4's, Region 5, Pacific Northwest 4 Wheel Drive Association--- Member- Mid Valley Prospectors, Brownsville, OR chapter GPAA, Willamette Valley Miners, Bohemia Mine Owners Association
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
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    22 Apr 2015 01:43 PM
    Gee...yea a den of rattlesnakes...now that's a party....I think if you are fortunate enough to know where a den is located....its already too late. I am hoping my knee high boots are high enough, unless those critters can strike above the knee when walking. Do they ever hangout above ground in the sage brush branches....?  
    Leo
    ANDREW GONTERUser is Offline
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    22 Apr 2015 01:50 PM
    What length of snake guards should you wear? I bought a pair of the snake guard boots that stop right below the knee. Was wondering if that is coverage enough. I live in Arizona and have heard that some Arizona snakes have attitude unlike most of out sports teams. lol
    SONIA CHAMBERLAINUser is Offline
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    22 Apr 2015 08:14 PM
    When I enlisted in the Army, I was told that our combat boots were the right height to protect us from snake strikes. Some people prefer to buy snake "chaps" that cover the whole leg. My gaiters are just shy of knee high. Yes, snakes do climb trees but I have only witnessed that once...it doesn't seem to be a common thing that they do. They can also climb over a 4' block wall if they are long enough. They are very clever and don't always rattle since it draws unwanted attention to them. Rattlesnakes can also swim and I have seen them in the lake where I live and in swimming pools. Be careful when walking past a rock or ledge as they can be on it and strike your upper body....BUT it is getting hot now, and during the day those snakes will be trying to cool off under a rock, bush or in their den. They move in the early morning and late evening when it is cool. As for wearing flip flops, don't forget the scorpions since we have the bark scorpions here in Arizona and they are the bad ones....small but can make one really sick, especially someone with a poor immune system. I wear gloves and if I need to move a rock when prospecting, I usually kick it first or flip it over with my boot. I have a plastic scoop and rock hammer that I dig with too.
    SONIA CHAMBERLAINUser is Offline
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    22 Apr 2015 08:49 PM

     Stanton has lots of open areas where you can see under the bushes and their are plenty of flat areas to detect on also.  I wouldn't worry about the snakes too much, but just be careful.  It is hot now and while we are detecting, the snakes will be cooling off underground or in the shade.  They do move at night and early morning, but there will be lots of activity in camp so the snakes will avoid that.  Your snake guard boots should be fine.

    ANDREW GONTERUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
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    22 Apr 2015 09:12 PM
    Thank you Sonia for the information. Hope we find afew nuggets while we are avoiding the rattlers
    Benjamin CrainUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
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    23 Apr 2015 09:42 AM
    As for snakes being able to climb the answer is a BIG YES. The only person I have ever seen bit was my Grandfather when I was a kid. He was trying to climb up a rock outcropping and reached his hand up on a rock ledge and it bit him across the top of the hand. He had more of a scrape than your typical puncture and refused to go to the hospital. That night his arm swelled up as large as one of his legs and he moaned all night long. The next day when he finally went to the hospital we learned that he had a heart attack as well.

    He thought because he just got scraped he would be fine, and he was very wrong. Most boots are high enough for your average snake, and knee high gaiters are perfectly adequate. Just remember that during the day they like the rocks, brush, and cactus because it provides shade and protection from predatory birds, but during the evening they get moving, and whatever you do if you get bit, GO TO THE HOSPITAL.

    Now when it comes to water moccasins they love climbing trees but y'all don't have those little monsters out West.

    As I said earlier I have had one try to bite through my boot because I was standing on it and that was a regular Combat Boot, but my question is can they bite through rubber boots? Frequently when I am working a riverbed I am wearing just rubber boots, they have good height but I don't know if they can get through the rubber??? Anybody have any experience with this?
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