What to do with all the lead?
Last Post 09 Jul 2018 11:34 AM by John Taylor. 18 Replies.
Printer Friendly
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Sort:
PrevPrev NextNext
You are not authorized to post a reply.
Author Messages
John TaylorUser is Online
Greenhorn
Greenhorn
Posts:15



--
25 Jun 2018 06:16 AM

    So, one thing I enjoy about panning is that, even when I do not find any shinies (which is the majority of the time), I am collecting a ton of lead (birdshot, bullets, and fishing weights) out of the creeks, rivers, and ground, which is good for the environment.

    But, I now have a ton (figuratively) of the stuff and, if I just pitch it in the bin, isn't that the same thing as just putting it back in the river (more or less from an environmental standard)?

    When I flyfish, I keep my cut line and all I find, and place it in the various collection canisters left about by a local flyfishing club.  Is there some type of mail-in or other way to properly dispose of this lead?

    As always, thank you in advance, and heavy pans!

     

    WALTER EASONUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:559



    --
    25 Jun 2018 07:31 AM
    Many of the recycle centers that take cans and steel will also have a price for other metals like lead, copper, tin. Price for clean is much more than dirty. Clean is usually absent of foreign material like paint, fish line, grease, large amounts of dirt. Call for prices and what they take. Things like mercury only goes to special location I think, some states have restrictions on the amount you can transport so stay under that amount.
    If you notice an error in the Online Mining Guide or with claim information please add in the updated information into the online mining guide to inform other members. Thank You Walter H. Eason
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:404



    --
    25 Jun 2018 10:25 AM
    Take it down to the local scrap metal dealer. It doesnt really seem that you care much to get money from it, but scrap metal dealer will give you something at least. Better than giving it in to a recycle center for free.
    Leo
    ARTHUR PEARSONUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:21



    --
    25 Jun 2018 04:54 PM
    Unfortunately most scrap dealers will not take lead bullets. Brass shell casings yes , but bullets no.
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:404



    --
    25 Jun 2018 11:06 PM
    And the reason being??
    Leo
    TIM LEIBELUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:581



    --
    26 Jun 2018 04:58 AM
    Please take a picture of you with all that lead. Those pictures help justify dredging to the tree huggers.
    Mary McCartyUser is Offline
    Miner
    Miner
    Posts:134



    --
    26 Jun 2018 08:35 AM
    Bullets are an alloy.
    My local recycler takes melted down bullet lead into ingots and has a specific price for it.
    Less also has some value at gun shows to people that do bullet casting.
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:404



    --
    26 Jun 2018 09:17 AM
    That is not entirely correct. Only if it is jacketed would it have 2 dissimilar metals. Shot could either be steel shot or lead. I do not know of the commonality of lead shot being anything but lead. An alloy is a metal which has a chemical bond of sub elements, where a metal that has a coating of another type metal is not actually an alloy.
    Leo
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:404



    --
    26 Jun 2018 09:19 AM
    Great idea Tim!!
    Leo
    John TaylorUser is Online
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:15



    --
    26 Jun 2018 12:03 PM
    I'll take a picture with what I got his past Sunday alone and post when I am home during daylight hours and post it here. Good advice all, and thank you!!!
    joseph LoydUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:514



    --
    26 Jun 2018 08:28 PM

    i know in ca and az the trash colection places will take from you.

    Member LDMA and several other clubs in CA.
    Mary McCartyUser is Offline
    Miner
    Miner
    Posts:134



    --
    27 Jun 2018 11:59 PM
    While I agree that lead Shot is likely pure lead, most bullet lead is alloyed. Jacketed hollowpoints and fmj and especially cast lead have a small percentage of nickel and antimony.

    Reloading is one of my hobbies and my teacher casts a lot of his own bullets.

    My local recycler in Texas gives a specific price for "bullet lead" and accepts what I take him melted down into ingots with trash skimmed out.
    LEO LORENZUser is Offline
    Lost Dutchman
    Lost Dutchman
    Posts:404



    --
    28 Jun 2018 09:32 AM
    Mary, thats a great idea....just to melt it down and put it in a ingot or other mold. I guess then no one could claim its bullet lead. And the small quantities of other trace metals would be insignificant in the overall weight.
    Leo
    KENNETH SWINEFORDUser is Offline
    Panner
    Panner
    Posts:27



    --
    29 Jun 2018 04:31 AM
    Obviously smelt this outside and don't breath the vapor when smelting, When you melt lead to form ingots unlike other metals the ugly stuff that floats onto the top will be any impurities/alloys. You don't need a flux. The slag that forms can be skimmed off prior to pouring your ingot. An old cast iron pan that no longer sees use works well enough for a crucible.
    ROGER JONESUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:1



    --
    30 Jun 2018 11:10 PM
    I'm in black powder club, make own balls or shot, always need pure lead, so might locate a club, they will take lead off your hands. Roger,  GPAA MEMBER.
    joseph LoydUser is Offline
    Buzzard
    Buzzard
    Posts:514



    --
    01 Jul 2018 12:44 PM
    the only thing i have to say is you need to watch for mercury while melting it .that would be my only concern.
    Member LDMA and several other clubs in CA.
    Lonny WilcoxUser is Offline
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:5



    --
    01 Jul 2018 08:11 PM
    Watch out for the gold as well. It won't melt and it sinks in lead.
    Mary McCartyUser is Offline
    Miner
    Miner
    Posts:134



    --
    02 Jul 2018 06:22 AM
    Lead tends to clear itself when you melt it anyway. (So does gold for that matter lol).
    Metals will layer out by melting point and density/molecular weight.
    When you melt lead, everything but gold and heavy radioactive elements float to the top and can be skimmed. The heavier goes to the bottom.
    Be VERY careful when melting!!!
    Do it outdoors with good ventilation!
    A lot of metal vapors including lead are toxic and accumulate in the body over time and take chelation therapy to remove.
    If you survive.
    Just be careful and you'll be ok.
    Make sure everything is dry!!
    Liquid lead is extremely hot and when water hits it it, it turns to steam literally with explosive force and tends to splatter liquid lead when it does this. DO wear eye protection please!
    I did get lead burns so learned this fun fact the hard way...
    Take precautions, play some tunes and it can be a relaxing afternoon activity.
    Ignore safety and you can get scarred for life.
    Meanwhile, enjoy!

    Mary
    John TaylorUser is Online
    Greenhorn
    Greenhorn
    Posts:15



    --
    09 Jul 2018 11:34 AM
     

     lol - after 10 minutes of fussing around with the window here trying to figure out how to paste the picture of my pan with all the lead, I give up - the computer wins!    If someone knows how and could give me a nudge (or boot up the backside if I am being dense), I would appreciate it!

    You are not authorized to post a reply.