Alluvial Fan tips...?
Last Post 09 Apr 2017 09:35 AM by Larry Sugden. 14 Replies.
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Michael ZappUser is Offline
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16 Jan 2017 10:59 AM

    It seems like the majority of available claims are of the alluvial fan types.  Does anybody have any prospecting tips for these particular areas?  It is not like there are geological markers that are easier to follow.

    I am getting tired of prospecting and finding nothing but sand and sweat in these areas.  I am just curious if anybody out here has any tips that might help me be a little better with my prospecting.  I am not afraid of doing the labor involved to get that gold, just would like a little better direction as to where to search.

    Arizona prospector and have plenty of washes and alluvial areas to go through.

    Thank in advance. 

    RONALD PETERSONUser is Offline
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    17 Jan 2017 12:07 PM

         There are 9 or more types of alluvial deposits which are formed by the action of running water.  Placer deposits are formed by the mechanical concentration of mineral particles from weathered debris called corrasion, also known as mechanical erosion and includes running water, wind, glaciers, gravity, or waves that move material along.

         So what does this have to do with finding gold ?  Not a thing, but it does give us a good idea how gold, once it is freed-up from the host rock is moved about.  The trick is to find where the gold has been deposited by this movement, providing your in an area that has gold in it.  Also if the area has quartz, iron, and is faulted, this is a good indicator, but is not a guarantee of gold.

         As far as finding gold it boils down to exploring, patience, sampling, investing time, situational awareness, experience, that gut feeling, and knowing that gold does not know the rules as to where it should be found.  With more and more practice you will get better and better at finding gold.          AZ Ron

    ARTHUR WAUGHUser is Offline
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    17 Jan 2017 12:24 PM
    Probably the best place to start is where the water starts to spread out and slow down.  That is where the heavies are going to drop first.  Look for anything such as boulders, big rocks, ledges, logs, etc., that break the natural flow.  I would suspect the further down in the fan, the finer the gold, and the harder it is to recover.
    OHV/Recreation Representative, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council, BLM--- President, Wolfpack 4x4's, Region 5, Pacific Northwest 4 Wheel Drive Association--- Member- Mid Valley Prospectors, Brownsville, OR chapter GPAA, Willamette Valley Miners, Bohemia Mine Owners Association
    ADAM ANDREWSUser is Offline
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    18 Jan 2017 09:03 AM

      Try looking at locations pictured in the history books as rich Gold mining areas. Some guys dry wash the tailings at abandoned old mines.

    Keith PerronUser is Offline
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    18 Jan 2017 11:04 AM
    If you have a metal detector look for high concentrations of black/magnetic sands. That would also be a good area to start looking.
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 03:58 PM
    Are you anywhere near Stanton, AZ? Are you using a detector or pan/drywasher/recirculator? I am a member here for years but first post. Been digging Stanton area for years. TTC
    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 04:10 PM

    Posted By ARTHUR WAUGH on 17 Jan 2017 12:24 PM



    Probably the best place to start is where the water starts to spread out and slow down.  That is where the heavies are going to drop first.  Look for anything such as boulders, big rocks, ledges, logs, etc., that break the natural flow.  I would suspect the further down in the fan, the finer the gold, and the harder it is to recover.

     

    Art, Is he talking about  "dry" alluvial fans (bajadas).... or did I miss something?  I believe he is talking about high desert alluvial fans where the sand/gravel forms large areas at the base of mountain ranges. The gold there is concentrated into streaks/patches in situ because the sand is blown away by winds. Good places to use detectors.  TTC









    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    ARTHUR WAUGHUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 04:34 PM

    He could be, no indication of where he has been looking in his post, but by normal defininition, alluvial fans are generally created by water action, so that is the basis for my reply.

    While I can agree that in that type of country, yes some gold will be moved by wind (usually the super fine stuff), most will remain where dropped and buried by the original action that created the fan, that being  high fast water as it slows and spreads, flash flood,  or otherwise.

    Have never done any desert prospecting or mining, so not familiar with that type of fan, ours are all wet types in the Pacific Northwet.

    OHV/Recreation Representative, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council, BLM--- President, Wolfpack 4x4's, Region 5, Pacific Northwest 4 Wheel Drive Association--- Member- Mid Valley Prospectors, Brownsville, OR chapter GPAA, Willamette Valley Miners, Bohemia Mine Owners Association
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 04:40 PM
    Posted By Terrance Cieszki on 23 Mar 2017 04:10 PM

    Posted By ARTHUR WAUGH on 17 Jan 2017 12:24 PM







    Probably the best place to start is where the water starts to spread out and slow down.  That is where the heavies are going to drop first.  Look for anything such as boulders, big rocks, ledges, logs, etc., that break the natural flow.  I would suspect the further down in the fan, the finer the gold, and the harder it is to recover.

     

    Art, Is he talking about  "dry" alluvial fans (bajadas).... or did I miss something?  I believe he is talking about high desert alluvial fans where the sand/gravel forms large areas at the base of mountain ranges. The gold there is concentrated into streaks/patches in situ because the sand is blown away by winds. Good places to use detectors.  TTC

     

    Thanks for the INSTANT reply Art. I'm sure we will talk again.  TTC





















    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 04:41 PM
    Why are my posts so much larger? New here.  TTC
    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    Michael ZappUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 04:45 PM
    Thanks guys. Yes I am in AZ. I live in the PHX Valley and fairly new to prospecting. From where I live it is a drive to get to the Stanton area or anywhere really.
    I recently got a White's GMT and typically run a recirc system.
    Appreciate all of the input. I am trying to have better options when I can make it out. Mainly I am around the San Domingo wash or up near Prescott when I prospect.
    Kinda looking to better my odds. Haven't had much research to go off of. Kinda hoping to pick up tips.
    Keep them coming guys!

    Knowledge is power, proper use of that power is wisdom....
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 05:17 PM
    Hey Mike. Look up Stanton on Google Earth (free plug). You will see a five mile long "delta" of sand and rock that comes down out of the mountains. Anywhere on that sand is good. Look up the history of Rich Hill area or the Octavia Mine (still active). Much of the delta is club claims, membership required. But there is still LOADS of BLM land to dig for free. If you start out there by getting a membership, I would suggest Roadrunner or my favorite, Weaver Mining District (club) in Congress. The bottom of the washes are no longer the best places, though. During the depression (second rush) dozers were used to scrape the overburden out of the bottoms. Here is the not so secret tip: DIG THE BERMS! That is where the gold is. I can almost guarantee that you will collect the first year's membership fees the first day! Caveat. You will have to work and sweat for it. Stanton is also an LDMA claim. There, you will dig the washes just west of the RV park. Good luck!  TTC
    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    Terrance CieszkiUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 05:34 PM
    One more thing, Mike. I owned a GMT. Page 17 of the manual will tell you to use the MANUAL mode of ground balance for better sensitivity. Very good idea.  TTC
    Come out from under your bed today, DO SOMETHING!
    Michael ZappUser is Offline
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    23 Mar 2017 05:43 PM
    Got it second hand. I need to get the manual online
    Larry SugdenUser is Offline
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    09 Apr 2017 09:35 AM
    Keep in mind that fans, (alluvial and eluvial), are triangle shaped. Look toward the apex (high point) of the triangle. Fans are caused by various erosion forces, so that means a lot of sand and gravel was deposited there. Gold is heavy, so it will try to sink to the center of the earth until it is stopped by something (bedrock, clay, packed gravels, etc.).

    I was sluicing in Colorado a couple weeks ago and met a fellow prospector who shared a tip with me. He said he often finds pits where others have dug and gave up because they found nothing. Since they did some of the hard work for him, he gets in the pit and digs deeper and finds gold. He said most people don't dig deep enough. He was down 3 1/2 feet and still had not hit bedrock, yet he was pulling out about a half a gram a day from that one pit.

    Once you find a likely spot, DIG DEEP.
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